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Do you have enough medication to cover the Christmas and New Year period?

During the Christmas and New Year period, the practice will be closed on the following dates:

  • Wednesday, 25 December 2019
  • Thursday, 26 December 2019
  • Wednesday, 1 January 2020

If you take any prescription medications, please make sure that you have enough or make sure you order a repeat prescription early enough to cover you for this period – please allow at least 48 hours (working days only) before collecting your repeat prescription.

What’s in Your first Aid Kit?

It is also a good idea to check your first aid kit is well stocked for Winter to help you self care for minor illnesses and injuries. There are a number of things you can have in your first aid kit for any such eventualities:

  • Thermometer
  • Painkillers such as Paracetamol or Ibuprofen (or infant paracetamol for children)
  • Cough medicine
  • Cold and flu relief drinks or capsules
  • Throat lozenges
  • Diarrhoea relief
  • Antiseptic cream
  • Antihistamine tablets
  • Plasters
  • Tweezers
  • Sterile gauze dressings
  • Bandages
  • Alcohol-free cleansing wipes

Your local Pharmacy is a great place to stock up on all the above items and you can find your nearest one and view their opening hours at NHS Choices.

Please remember to make sure your first aid kit is kept in a cool, dry place out of the reach of children.

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Order your repeat prescriptions online

Did you know you can order your repeat medication online?

This service is available 24 hours a day and can be accessed through any computer, smartphone or tablet, whether at home or at work.

EMIS Access uses the highest internet security measures to ensure all patient information is safe and secure. You can even book or cancel appointments online too.

If you are not already registered, ask at reception for your unique login ID and pin number.

If you are already set up, order your repeat prescription now!

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Have you had your flu vaccine yet?

To book your flu vaccine, please contact the practice on 01889 562145 and speak with a member of the Reception Team to book your appointment

Who is eligible for the flu vaccine?
• Any person aged 65 and over
• Any person who have a long-term health condition e.g. Asthma; Diabetes; COPD; etc
• If you are pregnant
• If you are a carer

You can find out more about flu and the importance of having the vaccine at http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/flu-influenza-vaccine/

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Would you know the signs and symptoms of dementia?

We are encouraging people to learn the signs and symptoms of dementia to help catch the condition early.

Dr Sukhdip Johal, GP in Staffordshire, said: “Dementia is a condition which causes people’s brain function to decline, typically as they get older. 

“People with dementia may notice memory loss and a change in mood, amongst other symptoms.

“If you experience any problems associated with dementia you should visit your doctor as soon as possible so they can test for dementia with a memory test. These symptoms do not necessarily mean you have developed dementia, but it is always best to get checked out. 

“If dementia is suspected, you will be referred to the memory team here in Staffordshire, who will do further assessments and refer you to the appropriate specialist. 

“The sooner dementia is diagnosed, and the sooner treatments begin, the easier it is for us to slow its progression.”

People with dementia may notice they are having problems with: 

  • memory loss 
  • thinking speed 
  • mental sharpness 
  • language 
  • understanding 
  • judgement 
  • mood 
  • movement 
  • difficulties carrying out daily activities. 

As people are living for longer than ever before, dementia has become a very prominent health issue in our community. In Staffordshire there were 11,600 people aged 65 and over living with dementia in 2018. That number is expected to rise to 15,200 by 2028; an increase of 32 per cent. 

For more information on dementia visit the NHS website.  

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NHS 111 now available online

NHS 111 is now available online, providing people with fast and convenient access to urgent health advice digitally.

NHS 111 online offers people an alternative to the 111 phone service, as well as helping to manage increasing demand on the telephone service – but please note it does not replace the phone service.

How does it work

To access the service simply visit 111.nhs.uk, enter your age, sex, postcode and main symptom, and then you will be guided through a series of questions about your health problems.

At the end of the questions you will be given advice about the best course of action to take next, which could be:

  • information on how to get the right healthcare in your area, including whether you need to see a GP or seek urgent care
  • advice on self-care
  • In most areas, get a call back from a nurse, doctor or other trained health professional if you need it.
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Antibiotics are not always the answer

Taking antibiotics when you don’t need them can make you become resistant to the, which means that antibiotics may not work when you really need them.

If you or a family member feel unwell, have a cold or flu and you haven’t been prescribed antibiotics, there are some effective self-care ways to help you feel better:

  • Ask your Pharmacist to recommend medicines to help with symptoms or pain
  • Get plenty of rest
  • Make sure you or your child drink enough to avoid feeling thirsty
  • Fever is a sign the body is fighting the infection and usually gets better by itself in most cases
  • You can use paracetamol if you or your child are uncomfortable as a result of a fever
  • Make sure you use a tissue for your nose and wash your hands frequently to avoid spreading your infection to family and friends

How long should my symptoms last for? 
Here are a few guidelines to help you judge how long some common illnesses and symptoms should last for: Common illnesses Most people are better by Earache (middle ear infection) 8 days Sore throat 7–8 days Sinusitis (adults only) 14–21 days Cold 14 days Cough or bronchitis 21 days.

Common Illnesses Most people are better by
Earache (Middle ear infection) 8 days
Sore throat 7 – 8 days
Sinusitis (adults only) 14 – 21 days
Cold 14 days
Cough or bronchitis 21 days

If you’re not starting to feel better by these guide times, contact your GP or call NHS 111.

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Help Us to Help You This Winter

Winter conditions can be seriously bad for our health, especially for people aged 65 or older, and people with long-term conditions such as COPD, bronchitis, emphysema, asthma, diabetes or heart or kidney disease. Being cold can raise the risk of increased blood pressure, heart attacks and strokes.

It’s important to keep warm in winter

Keeping warm over the winter months can help to prevent colds, flu and more serious health problems.

  • Heat your home to at least 18°C (65°F)
  • Keep active when your indoors, try not to sit still for more than an hour
  • Wear several layers of light clothes, several layers trap warm air better than one bulky layer
  • Close your curtains at dusk and keep doors closed to keep out any draughts
  • Get your heating system checked regularly by a qualified professional

You may be able to claim financial and practical help with heating your home. Grants available include Winter Fuel Payment and Cold Weather Payment.

Feeling unwell? Don’t wait – get advice from your nearest pharmacist
At the first sign of a winter illness, even if it’s just a cough or cold, get advice from your pharmacist, before it gets more serious. Act quickly. The sooner you get advice from a pharmacist the better. Pharmacists are fully qualified to advise you on the best course of action. This can be the best and quickest way to help you recover and get back to normal. If you can’t get to a pharmacist yourself, ask someone to go for you or call your local pharmacy.

Have you had the flu jab?
The flu virus strikes in winter and it can be far more serious than you think. Flu can lead to serious complications such as bronchitis and pneumonia, and it can be deadly. That’s why the flu jab is free if you’re aged 65 or over, or if you have a long-term health condition. If you have young children or grandchildren they may also be eligible for a free flu vaccination. And if you are the main carer of an older or disabled person you may also be eligible for the free flu jab. Just speak to your GP receptionist or pharmacist.

All About Flu and How to Stop Getting It Leaflet

Help Us Help You Leaflet

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Antibiotics are not always the answer

Taking antibiotics when you don’t need them can make you become resistant to the, which means that antibiotics may not work when you really need them.

If you or a family member feel unwell, have a cold or flu and you haven’t been prescribed antibiotics, there are some effective self-care ways to help you feel better:

  • Ask your Pharmacist to recommend medicines to help with symptoms or pain
  • Get plenty of rest
  • Make sure you or your child drink enough to avoid feeling thirsty
  • Fever is a sign the body is fighting the infection and usually gets better by itself in most cases
  • You can use paracetamol if you or your child are uncomfortable as a result of a fever
  • Make sure you use a tissue for your nose and wash your hands frequently to avoid spreading your infection to family and friends

How long should my symptoms last for?
Here are a few guidelines to help you judge how long some common illnesses and symptoms should last for: Common illnesses Most people are better by Earache (middle ear infection) 8 days Sore throat 7–8 days Sinusitis (adults only) 14–21 days Cold 14 days Cough or bronchitis 21 days.

Common Illnesses Most people are better by
Earache (Middle ear infection) 8 days
Sore throat 7 – 8 days
Sinusitis (adults only) 14 – 21 days
Cold 14 days
Cough or bronchitis 21 days

If you’re not starting to feel better by these guide times, contact your GP or call NHS 111.

For more information, and what signs you need to look out for which may be symptoms of a more serious conditions, download Public Health Englands Antibiotics Leaflet

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Know you numbers

Do you know your risks of high blood pressure numbers?

High blood pressure usually has no symptoms. The only way to know you have it is to have a blood pressure check.

The facts

  • High blood pressure contributes to half of all heart attacks in the UK
  • High blood pressure is the biggest cause of chronic kidney disease
  • Those with high blood pressure are three times more likely to develop heart disease
  • High blood pressure causes 60% of preventable strokes in the UK
  • High blood pressure increases the risk of vascular dementia

You can get your blood pressure checked at a number of places.

  • Some pharmacies
  • Your GP Practice (some practices even have a device in reception available to use)
  • Some workplaces
  • At home – you can now buy blood pressure monitors to use at home

If you are worried about your blood pressure, book your appointment at your practice.

You can find out more information about ‘Know Your Number’ week at their website.